Welcome to iGEM TIES
Mapping iGEM team interactions

Project description


  • iGEM TIES (Team IntEraction Study) explores how iGEM team interactions, diversity and transdisciplinarity impact the global performance of iGEM teams and the learning experience of the students.

  • Since August 2019, iGEM TIES collaborates with iGEM Grenoble (France) as part of their Human Practices project on interdisciplinarity and group performance.

  • Join the study and take part in the first large scale description of iGEM team work! You can register your team below, or shoot us an email at igem-ties@cri-paris.org if you have any question.

  • All the collected data is anonymised, kept secured on a server, and participation to each data collection is completely voluntary.

  • Participating teams will get a report of their team interactions (interaction networks, number of interactions etc) after the Wiki Freeze. This way the teams can have something to show in their presentation at Jamboree time!

Register below for the CRI x iGEM Grenoble collaborative study!

Project details


The iGEM TIES project (Team IntEractions Study) is a research study conducted at the Center for Research and Interdisciplinarity (CRI) in Paris. In this project, we study how team interactions and team diversity impact the performance of iGEM teams and the learning experience of the students. How do students collaborate? How are subgroups formed? What is the frequency of interactions with mentors/PIs? How do these interactions lead to better learning (skill spreading), productivity (BioBricks produced / project size), creativity (project uniqueness) or just success in the competition (medals, prizes, winners)?

To answer these questions, we are partnering with iGEM teams to conduct a quantitative, large-scale study, using several methods:

Questionnaires

We prepared questionnaires to be filled by team members at the 3 time points during the project. They allow us to better understand the team process and diversity!


Communication metadata

The analysis of the metadata (user-timestamp) from communication networks (Slack, WhatsApp, E-mail, etc.) at the end of the project allows to better understand the communication flows within the team.


Proximity experiment

Lastly, we built a smartphone application that allows to measure interactions of team members in the lab using bluetooth signals. By using the application on certain days during the study, we can reconstruct team interaction networks in the lab!

All this data is anonymised, kept secured on a server, and participation to each data collection is completely voluntary. After the wiki freeze we provide a report summarizing some general analytics of the team (networks of interaction, number of interactions etc). This way the teams can have something to show in the presentation at Jamboree time!

If you want to be involved, it’s simple! A representative should register your team members by using her/his iGEM ID at the top of the page. You will then receive instructions on how to get involved. You can find more information about the study in the information form and in some background slides. If you have any questions, contact us by email at igem-ties@cri-paris.org! Also, if you know of other teams that would be interested, spread the word!

Team members

Marc Santolini

Team leader in network science at CRI Paris, visiting researcher at the Network Science Institute of Northeastern University and at Harvard Medical School.

Oleksandra Sorokina

Research intern. Graduated student in interdisciplinary approaches to the Life Sciences at the CRI, current M2 EdTech student. Ex-iGEMer 2017 and 2018.

Naina Goel

Research intern. I am an AIV master student at CRI. Keen learner, passionate biologist inclined towards interdisciplinary and translational research. Super nerd who loves Rstudio, Matlab and is fascinated by designing synthetic biology systems. I dedicate my knowledge for the upliftment of society and I love Citizen Science.

Nidhiben Patel

Research intern. I did my masters in interdisciplinary life science research at CRI Paris and I like to do science which connects me to more people (for example: DIY and Citizen Science projects).

Emma Barme

PhD in Science of Science and Computer Science. I use network methods to analyse data on the research process and understand the trajectories of researchers.

Raphaël Tackx

I'm a postdoctoral fellow in network science. I develop mobile applications to measure real-world social networks. My background is in Computer Science and during my PhD, I focused on graph theory and its application to social network analysis.